Tag: Virginia Woolf

The Enlightenment of Lily Briscoe – Jac Saorsa

It was the summer of 1910. Wispy cirrus clouds skittered nervously across a pale sky as Lily Briscoe, brush in hand, stood before her easel at the edge of the lawn in front of the Ramsay’s house. From where she was standing she had a clear view of the sea and the rocky coastline of the Isle of Skye, and then, at some distance from the shore and standing out starkly in the soft summer light, the lighthouse, a tall, solitary pharos on a rock barely the size of a tennis court. But her canvas was empty…

‘We cease to be soldiers in the army of the upright; we become deserters’

‘…Woolf saw that a subjective perspective was required to make sense of how death continues to inflect the mood of a generation. Mourning, as Sigmund Freud also realised at a similar point, is ongoing, illusory work. What is remarkable about her writing is that Woolf … Continue reading ‘We cease to be soldiers in the army of the upright; we become deserters’

‘…the question is not only what madness might mean, but what it does.’ – Nonia Williams on Ann Quin

Guest host Nonia Williams from the University of East Anglia will be leading our discussion of Ann Quin this week and has written about Quin’s work in an article entitled About/of madness: Ann Quin’s The Unmapped Country for the journal Textual Practice. Throughout her life, … Continue reading ‘…the question is not only what madness might mean, but what it does.’ – Nonia Williams on Ann Quin